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Harry's Last Battles & Rowling's Beliefs

A Review of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows


by Berit Kjos

"Days before the release of the seventh and final novel in the series, youth leaders are being told they could use the popularity of the Potter books and films as a 'launch pad' for exploring Christian themes."[1] 'Use Harry Potter to spread Christian message'

"The story of Harry Potter is, and always was, a Christian allegory - a fictionalized modern day adaptation of the life of Christ, intended to introduce his character to a new generation....

"...knowing more about her [Rowling's] religious beliefs is not just crucial, not just enormously significant, but will blow the whole thing open, so that even a 10 year old will be able to figure it out."[2] Abigail BeauSeigneur

"The Harry Potter novels... address the need... we have for spiritual nourishment in the form of edifying, imaginative experience of life in Christ."[3] John Granger

"Woe to those who call evil good, and good evil..." Isaiah 5:20

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"The story of Harry Potter is an allegory," observed Peter, a former temple-master in an occult order. "It is written and packaged to look like fantasy when, in truth, it is a carefully written true description of the training and work of an initiate in an occult order." Peter continues,

"...everything Harry does is an extension of his belief system. His foundation is in magic through will. The concept that magick is an extension of will is a foundational occult truth and is diametrically opposed to the Christian concept of will where every born again believerís individual will is brought into submission under Christ."[4]

In spite of this unbridgeable chasm between occultism and Christianity, Joanne Rowling insists that she is a believer. She has kept the details of her faith a secret, explaining that such information would disclose the mysterious ending of her popular series. So when asked if she was a Christian, she gave this answer:

"Yes, I am, which seems to offend the religious right far worse than if I said I thought there was no God. Every time Iíve been asked if I believe in God, Iíve said yes, because I do, but no one ever really has gone any more deeply into it than that, and I have to say that does suit me, because if I talk too freely about that, I think the intelligent reader, whether 10 or 60, will be able to guess whatís coming in the books.Ē[5]

Now that the final book is out, there's no need to guess. We know the end of the story -- one that supposedly matches the author's beliefs. So what does it tell us?

ARTICLE continues.